Picture of a banana skin - an accident waiting to happen - from the Bun Karyudo humor blog.

Accidents Waiting to Happen

Amazingly, I haven’t done it yet. As I unlock the side gate to my apartment building after work each day, I look down at the drain grate directly beneath my feet and gulp. I know it’s only a matter of time. I’m just one dropped key away from having to spend a fun-packed evening groping around up to my shoulder in filthy water.

 

The drain is an accident waiting to happen. But it’s not the only one in my life. Take my new coffeemaker, for example. The water is stored in a plastic container that clips on to the back of the machine. Unfortunately, it doesn’t attach very well, and so a slip is inevitable. The day is certainly coming when the entire contents spill Niagara-like from the edge of the counter and cascade down over the assorted plugs and adapters underneath. On the bright side, I enjoy a rousing firework display as much as anyone.

 

Or there are the two guitars that I keep by the foot of my bed. Some morning, I will certainly trip over one or other of them as I get up. It’s even possible I may trip over both at the same time—one for each foot—and roll with them along the floor in a cacophony of splintered wood, snapping strings and unearthly caterwauling, like a slightly more melodic version of a Justin Bieber concert.

 

But even when we can see the risks we are running, sometimes we simply cannot avoid them. The bedroom is tiny, and so the guitars have to stay where they are since there’s no other place for them. Strictly speaking, I suppose I could tuck them into bed beside me at night. But then my wife would have to sleep vertically while leaning on a guitar stand—something that up to this point in our marriage, she has never shown the slightest interest in doing.

 

Now, you may be wondering why I’ve taken to worrying about all this. After all, I’ve been living with the dangerously placed drain for over a decade, the guitars for about the same, and even with the potentially pyrotechnic coffeemaker for the last three or four months. What explains the sudden upsurge in my anxiety levels now?

 

As many of you know, I have recently handed in my notice at the company where I’ve worked for the last eleven years. In a couple of weeks, I will start a new—and in many ways, quite different—job. I have my fingers, my toes and both my eyes crossed that I won’t be an accident waiting to happen.

 

 

© Bun Karyudo and the BunKaryudo Blog (2017)

(All Rights Reserved)

195 replies
  1. James
    James says:

    If it makes you feel better, I was in that state just over a year ago before I got my current job. Then I was in a permanent state of anxiety for the first few months of actually doing the job. Then the next few months and so on and so forth, but for the last few weeks I’ve been feeling slightly less anxious. Actually, reading back what I’ve just written I don’t think it will have helped at all. Sorry. But have you actually asked your wife if she would mind sleeping vertically. Just because she hasn’t shown any interests doesn’t mean she definitely isn’t interested and I think you owe to yourself and to your marriage to at least explore that idea. What could go wrong?

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      You’re right, James. I should certainly ask her. Vertical sleeping would not only save space, but make getting up in the morning so much easier. No more laborious rising out of bed. She’d simply take a step forward and be off.

      Reply
  2. jacquelineobyikocha
    jacquelineobyikocha says:

    Arrgh! That explains your fretting and worry. Congratulations Bun. Leaving a place of familiarity to a place of unknown can be discomforting to say the least but the thing is, you’ll settle in before you know it and all the anxiety will fizzle away. All the best with the new place.

    I am shamelessly attaching a little link of me below 🙂

    https://youtu.be/42utaicpFRk

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      Thank you, Jacqueline. I hope my anxiety fizzles away and my enthusiasm bubbles up. Incidentally, it was nice to hear you speaking on the link. I only occasionally get to hear what my fellow bloggers sound like! There are only three or four whose spoken voices i’ve ever heard, although their written voices I know very well! 😀

      Reply
        • elfidd / The Rooster
          elfidd / The Rooster says:

          Interesting that some (jacquelineobyikocha) assign voices in their head. As for me and my assignments, it’s geographic. I have Bun Karyudo about 17 floors up in a crowded apartment building with his collector of a balcony hanging precariously above a busy roadway in San Francisco of all places. Not far from that train station he has tromped off to on his way to work in the past. And how will this new commute come to be? I’m sure at some point we shall find out. Out from the old, into the new, we all await what will follow from you. The Best!

          Reply
          • BunKaryudo
            BunKaryudo says:

            It is interesting to imagine the geography of the people whose blogs we read. One example I can think of immediately is Sylvia from the Another Day in Paradise blog. She often blogs about the otters, alligators, iguanas and the like she finds at the bottom of her garden.

            Reply
  3. sportsattitudes
    sportsattitudes says:

    In my experience things happen in threes. Things especially love to arrive as a trio when I start something new. So…if I was in your situation I would most definitely be swimming in search of a key, recreating the 4th of July with a coffeemaker and inserting one foot firmly into a guitar. Godspeed.

    Reply
  4. thursdaynext
    thursdaynext says:

    Most of the guitars my husband and son owns are hanging on the walls – it works and we only sit down on them when the little one is playing guitar on the couch and then leave the guitar there to rest …but I think I understand what you mean…
    wish you all the best for the new job – sometimes universe can be friendly 😉

    Reply
  5. Annika Perry
    Annika Perry says:

    Bun, I’m now worried for you! If you have fingers, toes and eyes crossed you’re bound to have an accident – falling over your own feet whilst walking into a door post! Fingers crossed is allowed, toes and eyes only if sitting down! My life seems to be a constant of these type of accidents I just take them as norm – many times lost mobile, keys under decking – grrr… Cutting fingers whilst cooking….Watch our for your precious guitars and glad your wife is allowed to sleep in the bed! Best of luck with your new job!

    Reply
  6. carine
    carine says:

    nothing more exciting or stressful as starting a new job with new people and new expectations-on both sides. Hoping that this move will not be an “accident” but a wonderful start to a new chapter for you!

    Reply
  7. helmontpetit
    helmontpetit says:

    I have every confidence that you will be a resounding success in your new position (which I hope is not equivalent to your wife’s sleeping accommodations should you decide to give your guitars her space – by the way, I have two of my own!). Bless your courage in the face of choice and change!

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      My new position is not the same as the one I mentioned for my wife. They are somewhat similar, though, in that both require staying in a vertical position rather than lying horizontally.

      Incidentally, Hélène, I can state with complete confidence that you do a much better job with your two guitars than I do with mine. I’ve heard your songs before and they’re very good. You have a great voice! I sing like an elephant seal in heat and play the guitar with all the grace and passion of Mozart on the didgeridoo.

      Reply
  8. Eliza Waters
    Eliza Waters says:

    Have faith, Bun! You must believe all will be well and things will be even better than before. 🙂
    Oh, and here is a tip: Our front porch is of slatted wood with no getting underneath it (similar to your gate drain). Over the years, a few things have fallen through. Non-ferrous items are more problematic, but keys are a cinch. A heavy duty magnet glued onto the end of a stick works perfectly for retrieving lost keys. 🙂

    Reply
  9. Ann Coleman
    Ann Coleman says:

    I believe that if you have managed to avoid the grate, the guitars and the hot water on the back of your coffee maker for ten years, you will be able to avoid them for the next two weeks. Having said that, did I ever mention that on the very first day of my very first job out of college, I was in a car accident? The upside was that the shock of the accident took away my case of first-day-on-the-job jitters. So, one way or another, this new job will work out!

    Reply
  10. Robert Parker Teel
    Robert Parker Teel says:

    It will be just fine. It will be good. You have an agile, creative mind, and your new employer will be pleased to have you there. You’ve faced down that terrifying coffeemaker-from-another-dimension, so a new job will be a snap.
    OK, that’s settled, then.
    When you have more spare time, definitely tape the circuit breakers down & have your sons take a YouTube video involving you, guitars, the storm drain, and the coffeemaker, sounds like possibility for a truly great Spinal Tap tribute

    Reply
  11. Sheila Moss
    Sheila Moss says:

    I am the obsessive compulsive planner that always tries to anticipate what might happen — just in case. I have a closet full of disaster recovery items and emergency food in the event of a terrorist attack, earthquake, forest fire, or I don’t know what. I don’t know which is worse, you knowing something can happen and doing nothing about it or me, planning for something to happen that never will. As far as your new job, it will probably be fine after the first few weeks. They wouldn’t have hired you if they didn’t believe you could do it. My philosophy: Fake it till you make it.

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      That’s a good way to look at it, Sheila. You’re quite right! I have to remind myself they only hired me because they were so confident I could to the job (and, of course, because of the brown paper envelope stuffed with cash that I slipped to them under the table).

      Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      Thank you very much, Mary. I’m assuming that’s how the job is likely to work out. For one thing, I don’t think I’ve got the energy to sustain a state of high anxiety for very long.

      Reply
  12. mydangblog
    mydangblog says:

    I have to walk over very large subway grates every day, and I’m just like you, imagining what I would do if I dropped my house keys at that exact moment! Also, like you, I’ve just started a new position, and the learning curve (and the anxiety) are fun friends to have:-)

    Reply
  13. Vicki
    Vicki says:

    I am an accident waiting to happen too, but it’s merely because my mind is focused of seeing (not walking). I’ve had to move all small tables and other objects to the side of my pathways in my apartment as I am fed up with bruised (and once, broken elbow) from tripping.

    Having said that, I am compulsively neat and tidy and having always lived in a small spaces, a wiz at organisation.

    Shall I jump on a plane and come over to organise your place? (the trick is to send your children to the in-laws to live – or stand over them with the threat of toys being confiscated if not tidied away at the end of the day).

    Reply
  14. dave ply
    dave ply says:

    It’s not as bad as it seems. By now, autopilot has the key fumbling down to a fine art, and if you can avoid the guitars in the dark of the night for a quick trip down the hall, merely sidestepping with bleary eyes in the AM should be child’s play. As for the new job, a helpful mantra: change is good, change is good…

    But still, the world can always use another unique, well produced guitar solo, and I’m not sure anyone has introduced a coffee variety featuring electrocuted coffee, so maybe an opportunity awaits.

    Reply
  15. Gabe Burkhardt
    Gabe Burkhardt says:

    Why do accidents always “wait” to happen? Can’t they all get together and do their thing all at once. Just get it all over with so we can clean up the mess, pay the hospital bills, and go on tour with Rhianna featuring our latest Smash Hit. The more I think about it, it’s just rude.

    Go get em Bun.

    Reply
  16. YellowCable
    YellowCable says:

    I know how you feel. I think something you can’t do much about. In that case, you just hope you are mindful about it. That should reduce that probability to few digits less. While the other case where you can do something about it then I think you can do something to reduce the chance of it. Again, for a few digits less .. At the end, do not worry about it too much 🙂

    Reply
      • Lloyd Marken
        Lloyd Marken says:

        There’s a reason you got the gig and any boss worth their salt knows it takes 12 months for someone to fully own a role. They’ll expect you to start getting comfortable after a month but they will also expect you to be on a learning curve for the full year. You’re going to do great. You do the first day, then the first week, then the first month, season, year and before you know it you’re an integral part of the place. 🙂

        Reply
  17. arlingwoman
    arlingwoman says:

    Congratulations on the new job. Good luck with it. I hope the office has no complicated coffee makers or sinister drains. They often don’t show you that kind of thing until it’s too late.

    Reply
  18. Aquileana
    Aquileana says:

    Accidents are waiting to happen, that´such a true statement- Despite chaos, Entropy taches us that we (the universe) tends to find balance… which is something that pretty much applies to ourselves and our lives of we stop to think it… Statistically speaking accidents are far less than expected to be.
    I am wishing you best of luck with the new job… You´ll do well: I know it 😀 Just stay calm and carry on as the british motto goes.

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      I’m trying to adopt what I believe is the traditional British attitude of maintaining a stiff upper lip. Unfortunately, I can’t seem to do anything about my trembling lower one. 🙂

      Reply
  19. Widdershins
    Widdershins says:

    Congrats and good luck with the new job. 😀

    You do realise you’ve gone and done it now. You’ve put the whammy on yourself. I suggest contemplating a slightly inconveniencing accident where nothing is broken, and might incite sympathetic noises from the spouse

    Reply
  20. Robyn Haynes
    Robyn Haynes says:

    Each of us is just a banana skin away from disaster don’t you think? The thing is I’ve always subscribed to the ‘nothing ventured, nothing gained’ view of new ventures. Wishing you well for the new job Bun. Expect the best!

    Reply
  21. Diane Holcomb
    Diane Holcomb says:

    I can relate! And interestingly, I’m reading a book that may explain your upsurge in anxiety.

    The book is The Big Leap by Gay Hendricks. And no, it’s not about leaping into an empty concrete pool, or manhole, or off a cliff. It’s about how we all have a threshold of feeling good. When we start to feel too good, like taking on a new and exciting job, we start to get anxious because it’s above our threshold of happiness comfort. So we start to worry about things, or get into arguments, or get sick, or trip over the guitars at the end of our bed.

    All you have to do is raise your threshold of happiness. I haven’t gotten to the part of the book yet that explains how. But I think being aware is a start, and telling yourself it’s fine to be excited and thrilled about this change.

    Break a leg! Er, I mean, tally-ho!

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      Mu guess is that Gay Hendricks is delaying telling readers how to raise their happiness threshold until they’ve raised their happiness threshold and so can cope with the good news.

      Reply
  22. Sharon Bonin-Pratt
    Sharon Bonin-Pratt says:

    You’re just nervous about the new job and so everything seems perilous. Three simple solutions: Attach the key to a long cord and hang it from your wrist or belt. Get a small nightlight for the bedroom. Hire the teenage boys, one to lead and the other to follow you, and let them test the waters for accidents about to happen.

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      Thanks very much, Derrick. I accidentally sat on my strawberry jam sandwich earlier, so perhaps that will use up all my accident quota for the next couple of months.

      Reply
  23. Grace's Weekly Art Insights
    Grace's Weekly Art Insights says:

    Hi Bun,
    As always an uplifting and hysterical post from you.
    Congratulations on your new position…I am certain your ensuing posts will alert the masses to all the inherent danger and hidden pratfalls lurking at your new place of employment!

    All the Best,
    Grace

    Reply
  24. scifihammy
    scifihammy says:

    I hate those drains waiting to snatch your keys from your unsuspecting hand! – and guitars that lie in the same position for years, yet suddenly move and trip you up! But – I wish you all the best for your new job. Look on it as an adventure – but maybe wear a hard Hat! 😀

    Reply
  25. Maniparna Sengupta Majumder
    Maniparna Sengupta Majumder says:

    Life is prone to accidents. It’s our sheer good luck that most of the times, we make it through. Don’t worry, Bun… 🙂 that what happens, happens for good… might sound philosophical, but I believe in it.

    And, all the best for your new job…

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      That’s a nice positive way to look at it, Maniparna! I like it. I think the best way to approach my new job is to see it as an exciting opportunity to explore new horizons. (It sure beats the other alternative: seeing it as a terrifying leap off a cliff and into the unknown.) 😀

      Reply
  26. da AL
    da AL says:

    What a coincidence – just visited Costa Rica & stepped into many potholes, avoided many hanging branches and signs, as well as lost a contact lens down a drain with no catch screen. In U.S. am so shielded from disaster that I forget that I can’t go about like a sleep walker in other places…

    Dear Bun, how wonderful that despite your fears, you’ve take such a chance! Does keeping at fore of thoughts how even staying at same place involves risks help? Also, if the present change doesn’t result as hoped, it often results were the step to follows is even better.

    Of course, it is far easier to say than do, but encouragement always helps me. It is good to be vulnerable. After all, even the greatest athletes have coaches.

    With all of your loyal readers pulling for you, you’re bound to do well 🙂

    Reply
  27. Kristine @ MumRevised
    Kristine @ MumRevised says:

    I am so glad that I am not the only one who worries about those grates. One evening I was out for a lovely walk and saw that there was a twig sticking out of the grate below my feet. I kicked it to get it in the cavern so as not to cause a tripping accident. As I approached, I saw it move on its own in a sweeping “I’m gonna kill you” fashion. I had disturbed a critter in his slumberous state and it tried to give me rabies in return. Maybe it didn’t have rabies, but I like to think I dodged and frothing bullet that night. Pleasant dreams.

    Reply
  28. Binky
    Binky says:

    I suppose a new job could cause a good deal of anxiety, but I doubt they would have hired your if they didn’t believe you had something important to offer them.

    As for the guitars, I would mount them to the ceiling above your bed so they’re the first thing you see each morning.

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      Funnily enough, Binky, I thought right from the start that they would only hire me if I had something to offer them. Yes, it was hard stuffing that much money into a brown paper envelope, but it seems to have worked out pretty well.

      Reply
  29. Sue Slaght
    Sue Slaght says:

    Bun I have no doubt you are going to be amazing in your new job. Still I understand the nervousness about a new chapter. Think of all of the new blog material about to cascade down around you. Not like an avalanche just gentle snowflakes. Likely a bad analogy for someone who doesn’t have the white stuff. 🙂

    Reply
  30. Ellie P.
    Ellie P. says:

    Loved this! Wow, can I relate?! Why yes I can!! It’s the old anxiety-spreading-outward-from-the-primary-source syndrome. I had it myself, decades ago, when the subconscious me realized that social work was not the field to which I was best suited. I used to sit there and over-empathize with the clients, for one thing. This led to me thinking, What the hell am I doing on THIS side of the desk? And other such thoughts. Eventually this gave way to severe anxiety and panic attacks, first from actual work situations, then to driving on highways and over bridges. The problem finally dissipated with various techniques and therapists. It took a few years and leaving the field to do the trick!

    One other thing – the keys falling down the grate? Been there, done that – but instead of a grate, it was while exiting an elevator. The keys dropped down between the car and the wall of the shaft. Bye-bye! Extreme carefulness has since ensued!!

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      Being stuck in a job to which we are not suited is definitely an uncomfortable place to be. I can well understand how it could lead to all sorts of trouble with anxiety and panic attacks. I’m glad you were able to get over it all in the end.

      As for losing your key in the gap between an elevator and the elevator shaft, it was certainly unfortunate, but I’m very impressed by your aim! When keys are lost down a drain, there is at least a chance of getting them back, but I guess things that end up under an elevator are gone forever.

      Reply
      • Ellie P.
        Ellie P. says:

        Indeed! Oh, and I meant to add: Congrats on your new job and your bravery for leaving the old one! As your other fans have said, there’ll be a learning curve as in all new jobs, but that’s so normal and expected. Eventually it’ll feel as comfy as an old shoe…if you like old shoes.

        Reply
  31. Ellie P.
    Ellie P. says:

    Hi Diane! Just reading all Bun’s comments, cuz I’m nosy like that, and I see now that you wrote: “being aware is a start.” But silly me, I first read it as “being awaKe is a start” – which also is good advice, I think! (That’s what I get for reading stuff on my phone’s little screen at 7 a.m. when I am not a morning person. My cat insisted I get up. Sigh.)

    Reply
  32. SD Gates
    SD Gates says:

    Perhaps you should have a back-up key attached to yourself somewhere so just in case. I am a “just in case” person. I am one of those people where accidents don’t wait to happen. I have locked my thumb in car door, and waited for the person with the keys to come back 10 minutes later. I have fallen in to the pool deck skimmer and put a one inch puncture wound straight into my shin (it took 12 weeks to heal), I have bent over in my closet and knocked myself unconscious by hitting my head against the low hanging bar. The only person that cared was my Great Dane, who stood over me until I awoke. So, I have back-up plans for everything. I even have devised a plan for if we have a zombie apocalypse – my family must meet me at the Mormon Temple down the street, in case all communications are out. Just have back-up plans for all the things you can imagine that might happen.

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      Meeting at the Mormon Temple during a zombie apocalypse is probably a good idea. Any zombies you find there are likely to be extremely well-mannered and they will politely refrain from eating you as long as you contain either caffeine or alcohol.

      Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      It’s good advice to try to make the most of the anxiety and adrenaline rush we experience. I must admit, I now greatly regret not using my nervousness during my high school math classes to greater effect. If only I’d attached a small generator to my quivering lower jaw. Just think of the electricity I could have sold on to paper mills, automobile plants, and so on.

      Reply
  33. Elliesofia
    Elliesofia says:

    Lovely to be dropping by your blog again, Bun. I’ve been away too long. As I said to our Mick, my head is just fresh out of ideas for new posts at the moment so I’ll be enjoying catching up on some reading which will be good. However, I’m not closing my mind to the idea that an interesting thought or topic might surface – I can but hope. Very brave of you, handing in your notice – I really hope your new job turns out to be one that you feel happy in 🙂

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      Hi Ellie! Great to hear from you again! Thank you very much for dropping by. I hope that once you’ve had a chance to catch up on some of your blogging buddies, you’ll get back to writing posts again. 🙂

      Reply
  34. Hariod Brawn
    Hariod Brawn says:

    You’re too young for Catastrophe Thinking, Bun; save it up for your dotage, my friend! Good luck with the new job; I’m sure it’ll go well and you’ll feel like you’ve been there years after only a fortnight or so. Then again, a tree might fall on your head as you walk to work on your first day . . . who knows?

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      With luck, Hariod, I’ll get on well with everybody in my new job. If by some chance there are a few with whom there are problems, however, I hope the tree at least falls on their heads.

      Reply
  35. yvettecarol
    yvettecarol says:

    The nerves are understood, Bun. However, on the bright side, if you do stuff things up royally and stick your foot in it and have accidents, at least you’ll be able to blog about it, right? 🙂

    Reply
  36. davidprosser
    davidprosser says:

    I’m sure all your worries are unfounded, well except maybe for the coffeemaker as I have the same worry with mine.I wish you the very best of luck with your new job and hope it’s going to leave you stress free.
    Hugs

    Reply
  37. Peter Klopp
    Peter Klopp says:

    I remember your hilarious tale of your territorial struggles between you and your wife over more space that you share during the night. Having your poor wife sleep in a vertical position is definitely not an option. You would not want to add just an accident in waiting. All the best wishes for success and satisfaction in your new position, Bun!

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      I’ve well and truly jumped through the airplane doorway this time. Now as I hurtle earthward, I tug on the ripcord and find myself waiting with interest to find out whether or not my parachute will deploy.

      Reply
  38. Soul Gifts
    Soul Gifts says:

    I wish you all the luck of the Irish (I’m led to believe it’s good) with your new job. I was wondering if you are going to treat yourself to a new paper bag – create a good impression and all that by showing you have given care and thought to putting your best face forward 🙂

    Reply
  39. maryannniemczura
    maryannniemczura says:

    Why not a spare key to store in your wallet or somewhere else in the event the other goes down the drain. Life has a habit of doing that sometimes or so it seems. We too have a guitar stored in a bedroom. The violin is under the piano bench in the music room. We talk of downsizing but so far it’s talk. Good luck with the new and different job. Will you have another train commute? Congratulations and good luck. ^__^

    Reply
      • maryannniemczura
        maryannniemczura says:

        Hahaha. I purchased a hard case for the guitar our son left here when he moved. I have been trying to find someone to teach me. Meanwhile I remain busy with writing and editing and music practice.

        Reply
  40. thevillageman
    thevillageman says:

    Dear Mr Karyudo (really difficult name)
    I read your very interest blog about new job and also accidents.
    I am famous in all the villages for advices about problems and helping honest peoples live in correct way.
    You seem like man who understand life problems so maybe you may be interest to read my world blog stories about things like body shaming come to village, truth about body dismorfia and the problems that some peoples like Frederick from Oslo sending to me by emale.
    Thank you for your esteem and kind look to my humble websit thevillageman.com.
    Many regard
    thevillageman

    Reply
  41. Anonymous
    Anonymous says:

    Ah no, don’t cross both eyes or you will fall for ANY accident waiting to happen. Best of luck in the new job, though by acting positively you’ve probably turned “luck” a little more in your direction. By the way, I’ve seen lots of guitars hanging on walls so you may be permitted to do that? I figure they are less likely to fall on you than to trip you up. And you can train yourself to be free of the likelihood to fall victim to a grille: after leaving the house or parking your car, hook the large ring on your key-chain over your longest finger, or onto a clip on your belt. Or buy a key-ring with a stress ball on the end, bug enough that it wouldn’t fall through a grille. You CAN establish a new habit, as I found after losing my car keys once too often downtown: whenever I leave a counter I turn around and look at where I’ve been standing (check floor, counter) or feel in my pocket to make sure they’re still there. And after having had to crawl from the back of our old station-wagon into the front seat to retrieve keys left in the ignition, I trained myself to feel in my pocket before shutting the door. PS. our latest car screams at you if you open the door while key is in ignition or lights are on, which was a great innovation!!

    Reply
  42. Patty
    Patty says:

    You could also walk outside, across the street and get hit by a bus…
    I assume you thought well about this change of jobs, so I am sure it’s going to be a great new adventure.
    And remember, there is no rule that says you have to stick with a choice forever…if it doesn’t work out, you can make a new choice 😉
    XxX

    Reply
  43. Skipah
    Skipah says:

    I foresee your writing another post in eleven years talking about how the past eleven years were the best ever in your professional life. Hopefully you haven’t burned down the apartment by then, or found some new kinky form of relations with guitars. Or wait I think the Guitar Hero franchise beat you to that anyway!

    Reply
  44. Steph McCoy
    Steph McCoy says:

    Best of luck to you in your new position Bun!! Being the new kid on the block is a legitimate cause for anxiety but with each new day at your new job you’ll grow more comfortable and then one day you’ll wake up an old hand wondering where in the heck the time went.

    Reply
  45. dgkaye
    dgkaye says:

    Ahh yes, we are creatures of habit. It’s normal to feel anxiety when leaving the familiar for the unknown new ventures, but just think about how many new stories you will come up with. 🙂

    Reply
  46. Teagan Geneviene
    Teagan Geneviene says:

    Yew… Bun, that sounds like a hazard of every sort. Do take care.
    Congrats on the new job! I’ve been trying to get a job in a different location for five years. I guess I should say I’ve been failing to get a new job for five years…
    Wishing you all good things.

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      Thank you very much, Teagan! Good luck with your job search too. I have a lot of sympathy. I’d also been looking for a really long time. It’s just that now I’ve finally found something, I’m, um… scared.

      Reply
  47. Browsing the Atlas
    Browsing the Atlas says:

    You sound a little like my ex-husband in this post. He saw imagined dangers everywhere. I used to make fun of him and elaborate even more on what could happen, but between you and me – I always worried that I was jinxing myself while I did it.

    Reply
  48. Poet Rummager
    Poet Rummager says:

    Well, if you ever break your guitars, just pretend you’re into heavy metal music. Don’t they break guitars all the time during their concerts? Your kids would be amazed at how cool you are 😀

    Best wishes on your new job! So, you finally landed the new James Bond role, eh?

    Reply

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