Messy bedroom from the Bunkaryudo Humor Blog.

Behind the Times

That part of the world’s population waiting with bated breath beside their computer screens were no doubt shocked to their very marrow by the non-appearance. The rest of the world’s 7 billion people, however, somehow found the strength to carry on with their lives despite the fact that this post is half a day late.

 

I can only offer my profoundest, most sincere apologies (while accepting no financial liability of any kind). I would have written something had I but been able to get to my computer. Unfortunately, at my usual posting time, the keyboard was at the other end of a mountain range of stuff stretching majestically from one end of my bedroom to the other.

 

It all started two and a half days ago when it occurred to me that since my new job will almost certainly involve having to bring work home, I should probably make a few adjustments to the area around the desk in my bedroom in order to make it easier to use. I wasn’t thinking of anything too drastic, of course, just a few minor tweaks here and there. It had long annoyed me, for example, that getting a pen or pencil always involved groping up to the elbow in the darker recesses of my desk drawer. Then there was all the information I’d been given relating to my new job. It should clearly be kept in files somewhere near at hand.

 

Unfortunately, every inch of prime real estate on or around my desk was already occupied. Indeed, the only significant amount of space anywhere in the entire bedroom was an unused portion of shelf at the back of the built-in closet. This left me with only two choices. I could either take myself nearer that space or bring that space nearer me. Upon careful consideration, I brilliantly deduced my desk would not fit into the closet, so I took the bold step of pursuing the second strategy.

 

I began by loading up the shelf with some little used books. This had the effect of coaxing the space from the back of the closet out onto a bookshelf. Then by filling the bookshelf with some old CDs, I could transfer the space to the area the CDs had come from, namely the top of the wardrobe.

 

In this way, I planned through a series of cleverly coordinated item relocations to bounce the space around my bedroom—the top of the wardrobe, the back of a drawer, under the bed, next to the bookcase—until I eventually managed to maneuver it onto my desk, where it would at last be of some use. It was a strategy familiar to anyone who ever played one of those sliding picture puzzles as a child.

 

Sadly, somewhere around the middle of my bedside cabinet, my plans escalated wildly out of control like WW1. Before I knew it, I was embroiled in a full-scale tidy up. The next two and a half days were entirely occupied with filling bags, loading boxes and taking trips to the compactor. So much dust was thrown up into the atmosphere, crops yields for the next few years are likely to be adversely affected.

 

Thankfully, the task is all but finished. The Andean range of clothes, books and documents that once separated one side of my bedroom from the other has gone and the area around my desk is once again the perfect environment in which to work. I’m now ready to face whatever my job throws at me, provided it isn’t difficult, heavy or explosive.

 

 

© Bun Karyudo and the BunKaryudo Blog (2017)

(All Rights Reserved)

192 replies
  1. Aquileana
    Aquileana says:

    Hahaha!.. the ending lines are brilliant… ”Every cloud has a silver lining”, right?…. It seems the Disorder engendered order 😉 but be aware as it seems it is a cycle… so disrder might eventually show up. Unless you keep on being tidy! 😀
    Love & best wishes dear Bun. Happy new season!

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      Yep, the forces of chaos are always there, ready to take over at the first chance. I have to spend much of my time battling against them armed only with the mighty broom of spotlessness and the spray of disinfection. 🙂

      Reply
  2. patriciaruthsusan
    patriciaruthsusan says:

    This was great. My son was visiting for a time, mentioned I needed more book shelves and a filing system, then became embroiled in a more urgent matter here that needed attention, and returned home to leave me sort things out on my own. This means pretty much the same old, same old. I have, out of desperation, expanded to a nearby coffee table. It sounds like you were more successful than most. Congratulations! You’re an inspiration to us all. 😀 — Suzanne

    Reply
  3. tric
    tric says:

    And now you sit in your glorious freed up space, puzzled your family are not queuing up to admire it, and think’now what will I write?
    Maybe I need clutter to write?’

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      After I’d finished, my children did eventually drag themselves from the Playstation long enough to take a look. They must have been genuinely interested to see what my newly tidied bedroom was like since it took barely fifteen minutes of nagging to get them to come through – almost blistering speed by their standards.

      Reply
  4. barbtaub
    barbtaub says:

    Congrats on scaling Mt. Desk! Edmund Hilary and I salute you (although Tenzing Norgay is reserving judgement until we hear whether additional oxygen was required).

    Reply
  5. yvettecarol
    yvettecarol says:

    I sincerely hope the crop yields will survive and recover around the world, Bun. You made me laugh with that. Good one. Nothing like a once-a-decade clean up, hey? 😀

    Reply
  6. Robert Parker Teel
    Robert Parker Teel says:

    I never made the connection until you mentioned it — I always left those sliding picture tile games looking like Picasso. Maybe that’s why we have to periodically rent a Bobcat frontloader to re-stack the unread magazines and unmatched socks. somewhere in that pile, was a nifty DIY project to convert a shower to a work station, but I need to dry it out before I can send it to you. And the scanner is shorted out anyway

    Reply
  7. Vicki
    Vicki says:

    Good luck with that.
    With all that rearranging, you’ll be so busy looking for things, you won’t have time to do the work you anticipate bringing home 🙂

    Reply
  8. Kristine @ MumRevised
    Kristine @ MumRevised says:

    I will not be sharing this post with my husband. In order to escape the mess that is my office, we are currently under construction to build a new office for me. It requires nothing less than a big dig and a fat wallet. While your tidy-up may be a herculean effort, mine is entirely less economical.

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      Constructing an office? Wow! You may not want to show my post to your husband, but I think I’ll show your reply to my wife. I’ll accompany it with puppy dog eyes and pleading noises.

      Reply
  9. maryannniemczura
    maryannniemczura says:

    Ah, yes, creating space for the next adventure is always a challenge. Unfortunately I am not so inclined these days even though it is long overdue i.e. hauling off “stuff” to the Salvation Army, Rescue Mission or the trash. Retirement has not created in me a big desire to deal with the “stuff.” Perhaps you could build four walls of shelves and then find a cubby hole to sleep in. Your bedroom/office sounds cleaned up but crowded. Somehow we make do in life, huh? Happy blogging to you as you work from home. Your sense of humor is intact. ^__^

    Reply
  10. Ann Coleman
    Ann Coleman says:

    You have just described exactly why I hate to clean anything in our basement. Because the rearrangement of just one bin leads to another, and then another…. And then, like you, I am surrounded by piles of stuff that needs to be moved elsewhere, bags of more stuff that needs to be thrown out, and that inevitable pile of stuff I have absolutely no idea what to do with. As picky as I am about the rest of the house, our basement is always a disaster. I’m glad you’re done with the desk now, though, and no worries: I didn’t mope too much when your post didn’t arrive exactly on schedule. Nothing a few boxes of Kleenex and an anti-depressant or two couldn’t handle.

    Reply
  11. Carl D'Agostino
    Carl D'Agostino says:

    If you pump things full of helium they will rise to the ceiling which is excellent use of unused space. This also allows you to get more stuff for which your will also not have enough space. Another good idea is that if you have not used the item for three decades it is time to get rid of it. Well, maybe not three decades but that’s a start.

    Reply
  12. acflory
    acflory says:

    Ah hah! Been there, done that, still bear the scars. 😀 So glad you survived and have a workable space again. I’ve been thinking about doing something similar in my office but…that would mean relocating 3 cats and a dog, so I’ve decided against it. After all, I can still reach the keyboard so where’s the rush? -hugs-

    Reply
  13. YellowCable
    YellowCable says:

    Such a vivid description of space you have. I am impressed that you did not seem to get through the transition so well without any hints of difficulty to get rid of some items (I hope I read that correctly). I am not sure could do that well. Congratulation with your new theater to operate on 🙂

    Reply
  14. Sharon Bonin-Pratt
    Sharon Bonin-Pratt says:

    I started a similar campaign in my house but wised up and went out to lunch with friends instead. Organization is overrated. Just make sure the circular file is near your desk and you’ll be all set.

    Reply
  15. Binky
    Binky says:

    Don’t you have a balcony? I would suggest building a cantilevered extension, and constructing a full sized office out there. Some camouflage netting should prevent it from being noticed by any jealous neighbours.

    Reply
  16. Gabe Burkhardt
    Gabe Burkhardt says:

    hehehe Bun so worth the wait (and I forced myself to wait an extra day before commenting, not because I’ve been crazy busy or disorganized. This was purely a selfless gesture of altruistic friendship. You’re welcome 😉 )

    And since you have all this spare time and space on your hands, maybe you could pop over here and give me a hand with my desk. It’s the thing buried under the Skittles and crumpled Post It notes.
    Cheers!

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      Thanks very much, Gabe. Your comments are always welcome no matter when they appear. Funnily enough, when you explained the delay in writing was an altruistic gesture, it took me right back to my high school mathematics classes. When it came to doing homework for this class, my altruism was legend.

      Reply
  17. helmontpetit
    helmontpetit says:

    Woohooh! Making space for new things is a wunnerful achievement and a joyous thing to be celebrated. Well done, you! I am terribly curious though: what IS that new job? Are you now paid for your wit and talent? I do hope so.

    Reply
  18. Samantha
    Samantha says:

    Didn’t you feel great after tidying up!? (I always feel so composed and relaxed and buzzing with happy glows after things are neat and tidy and order has been restored ^^)

    Reply
  19. sportsattitudes
    sportsattitudes says:

    Sometimes it can be good for the soul to shake things up within one’s currently comfortable crib. Of course one needs to be able to find everything once it gets moved as well as not move things to the point you can’t find your way out. Could you imagine having to send up a flare for someone to come to your home and help you out of it…that would be a bit embarrassing. The only time I get close to your described scenario is when moving out of or into a new home. Stuff everywhere. Nowhere to move. Gives me the chills just thinking about it. I do like creating more space and utilizing space differently on occasion…but I always need my space.

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      It’s an operation that has to be thought out carefully. Somewhat as with decorating, I discovered it was possible to tidy myself into a corner, so surrounded by mountains of items that I couldn’t escape.

      Reply
  20. Ellie P.
    Ellie P. says:

    How wonderful! Good for you, Bun!!! I know how much easier it is to procrastinate, so: Applause applause!!!
    (btw it’s “bated breath” not “baited breath” – unless you’re trying to snag it and reel it in from the lake… 😉 )

    Reply
  21. Elliesofia
    Elliesofia says:

    Sounds like you’ve done a great job, Bun. I just hope your new boss recognizes your newly-discovered talent for mammoth organizational skills. I’ve being doing a similar ‘clearing out’ thing myself for different but equally valid reasons which I was going to write my next post about as I uncovered some real ‘treasures’ and ‘that’ll come in useful one day’ items. I do hope your new job goes well too, Bun. Ellie x 🙂

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      Thanks very much, Ellie. Let’s hope that my new bosses are so impressed by my mammoth organizational skills, they decide to give me a mammoth salary to match. I’m not holding my breath, though. 🙂

      Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      Putting away even a single item has to be done with caution. There’s no telling where it might lead. My children are so terrified of the possible consequences, they daren’t as much as pick up a sock from the floor.

      Reply
  22. jacquelineobyikocha
    jacquelineobyikocha says:

    You are obviously fitting in right well with the new job, and being a new bright kid on the block taking work home proves your mettle. I wish you could come over and rearrange for me. You’ve got it down to a pat 😉

    Reply
  23. maryannniemczura
    maryannniemczura says:

    Have you ever tried a poem with your sense of humor? I just wrote a blitz poem which was quick as the name implies. It was a challenge from Annika Perry, a fellow blogger. I know you can do it Bun. It might be fun too. Quite honestly, it was not my usual format, but I was able to “talk” about this past week in my life in that format. Annika wrote more freely and in the style of James Joyce. I found the form freeing this week and am curious to know what my readers think.

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      I’d like to write a poem
      But never have the time
      To write my words with rhyme
      And end my lines with rhyme
      I’ve been left brokenhearted
      By every poem I’ve penned
      ‘Cause though I can get started
      I don’t know how to finish

      Reply
      • maryannniemczura
        maryannniemczura says:

        This is a fine comment poem! I don’t worry about rhyming. Try your hand at haiku which is unrhymed and only three line with a total of 17 syllables. Or try your hand at a free form with short lines. I see what you have done with rhymes and laud you for it.

        Reply
        • BunKaryudo
          BunKaryudo says:

          Thank you! You know, I think most readers will probably have missed it, but I had some trouble trouble finding a rhyme for penned. It wasn’t until long after I’d posted my reply that I suddenly remembered liquidating dividend.

          Reply
          • maryannniemczura
            maryannniemczura says:

            Cool. There are rhyming dictionaries if one is seriously dead set on writing such poetry. My mother had the gift and wrote with ease and her poetry rhymed. Sigh. I did not inherit that talent. penned = fend, trend, friend???^__^

            Reply
            • BunKaryudo
              BunKaryudo says:

              I’d heard of rhyming dictionaries for years before I ever saw one. I was a bit disappointed when I actually took a look at one. I’d been hoping for a regular dictionary where all the defnitions were things like:

              giraffe – ruminant that will not eat anything down near its feet

              Reply
              • maryannniemczura
                maryannniemczura says:

                Hahaha. Writing poetry that rhymes is a great skill set. Sometimes, however, it doesn’t seem to make much sense if you simply concentrate on rhyming. I need to get my thoughts down first without worrying about rhyming. What rhymes with giraffe? Gaffe?

                Reply
                • BunKaryudo
                  BunKaryudo says:

                  That’s true. A lot of the greatest serious poetry doesn’t rhyme, after all. Rhyming does seem to help a great deal in humorous verse, though. I don’t know why, but there just seems to be something funny about the whole thing. Perhaps it has something to do with building up expectations. 🙂

                  Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      Thank you! I was pretty motivated, but I can’t really claim to have been organized. My tidy up was done in just about the least efficient way possible, which is why it took so long.

      Reply
  24. Hariod Brawn
    Hariod Brawn says:

    Now tell me, Bun, as regards the em dash, should one allow a space either side of it (short though I know you generally are of said, er, spacey stuff), or should one let the venerable em dash—thusly—abut other words?

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      That’s an interesting question, Hariod. I’d say spaces with em dashes are absolutely acceptable for anyone being paid by the column inch. They should also use colossal drop capitals while they’re at it.

      Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      Although I have the necessary analytical skills to work as a space planner, Beth, I think my approach may be a little old-fashioned for most organizations. For one thing, I think Pluto should be a planet again.

      Reply
  25. Poet Rummager
    Poet Rummager says:

    I believe a keyboard hammock would be perfect for you, darling. If you ever get tired of being so tidy, then you won’t ever lose your keyboard again, and we, your faithful readers, will never experience another moment of unrest from not hearing from you and your lovely sense of humor.

    “Everyone will be winning so much, we’ll get tired of winning!” 😀

    Reply
  26. jenanita01
    jenanita01 says:

    I have just experienced something very similar. What seemed like a great idea at the time, quickly turned into an ordeal. When and if I can remember where everything is, I might appreciate the absence of all my accumulated clutter!

    Reply
  27. In My Cluttered Attic
    In My Cluttered Attic says:

    Bun, now that you’ve added interior decorating to your list of accomplishments, my clutter appears to be even more out of control. Oh sure I’d love to claim that I too know how to keep up with the Karyudo’s (I gave up on the Jones’ years ago), but unfortunately I thrive in conditions less than pristine. Now my wife is asking me “Dear, why can’t you be more like Bun and raze that metropolis of trash accumulating up in your attic?” I don’t have the heart to tell her (nor the audacity… because I happen to like breathing) that my attic is full of clutter for a reason. The reason being: I’m lazy and my removing Pulitzer Prize winning post ideas—scribbled on billions of little pieces of paper littering the floor of my cluttered attic, none of which have made it to print yet—would require my backing the truck up and dumping it all. I ask you, how am I suppose to make time for doing something as crazy as that, when I’ve got important long-winded responses like this to write to you, especially when it’s on a post that’s this magnificent? So you see my problem, right? So I guess my wife will simply have to abandon this unreasonable and impractical idea of cleanliness when it comes to my unkempt writing area. Oh the folly!

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      You’re quite right, Paul. It’s entirely unreasonable to expect you to clean up that mountain of paper when it’s almost certain to contain a number of surefire Pulitzer prizewinners in it somewhere. (And when I say a number, I don’t mean some pathetic little number like 5 or 20, but a worthwhile number, like 6,000 or 25 million.)

      “Oh, but it’ll attract mice or horrible little beetles,” your wife may complain. Obviously, you should pay no attention to such nonsense. For one thing, there is not a shred of scientific evidence that mice care about Pulitzer prizes. When I was a child, I had a copy of “To Kill a Mocking Bird” on my shelf for years, and my pet (Jerry, of course!) never paid the slightest bit of attention to it. Strictly speaking, Jerry was a gerbil and not a mouse, but the principle is the same.

      Now I admit that many beetles do take an interest in great literature, particularly when they’re young. I don’t think there is any point denying such a widely known fact. It really is most unfair, however, to call such individuals horrible. On the contrary, I’ve always found them perfectly charming.

      Reply
      • In My Cluttered Attic
        In My Cluttered Attic says:

        I suspect you we’re just trying to spare my feelings with that rather conservative number range of 6,000 to 25 million… especially if you listen to my wife. And you’re quite right about those mice. All science has ever been able to prove about mice is that they make great guinea pigs when it comes to scientific experiments. As for Jerry and his not going anywhere near that copy of “To Kill a Mocking Bird” you had, perhaps it’s just possible he caught wind of Harper Lee’s first draft of her book, terribly titled “Go Set a Watchman.”That, or maybe he just needed a good pair of reading glasses. Still, I can’t argue with you about The Beetles. I’ve always heard that John, Paul, Ringo and George were not only fine musicians but equally well read, too. 😀

        Reply
  28. Soul Gifts
    Soul Gifts says:

    You have my heartfelt sympathy Bun. But then, you’re finished. I’m halfway between piles – scattered in 4 different rooms. It’s times like this I rather like the idea of a shoebox apartment!

    Reply
  29. vanbytheriver
    vanbytheriver says:

    A noble effort, and one I don’t take for granted. I set out to organize every piece of paper in my home a few years back. That involved no less than 7 desks where “valuable info” was being stored. It was gargantuan, took months, but so worth the effort.

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      Luckily, most of the stuff I was moving about wasn’t all that important. If there had been various bits of paper that actually meant something, that would have complicated things massively.

      Reply
  30. scifihammy
    scifihammy says:

    I have to laugh at your tidying up efforts! Moving that elusive space around your room. 🙂 Good Luck with your new work.
    The worst thing I find about tidying up, is that afterwards I can never find anything! 🙂

    Reply
  31. Peter Klopp
    Peter Klopp says:

    Bringing order into chaos has been a divine task, ever since the world had begun with the miraculous and equally mysterious Big Bang. I sympathize with you and readers above for having to undertake such herculean tasks such as cleaning up the phrygian stable in your job related office space. Not to be outdone I would like to proclaim that last summer I had to find space to store 40 years of furniture, millions of my wife’s knick-knacks, trinkets, and other junk after our old dilapidated house got demolished. Cheers!

    Reply
    • BunKaryudo
      BunKaryudo says:

      That does sound like a much bigger task, I must admit, Peter. I don’t think I’ll ever decide to demolition our home, though. I’m sure the other residents in the apartment building wouldn’t approve.

      Reply
  32. Sampada Moghe
    Sampada Moghe says:

    Congratulations on the new job Bun! 🙂 Hope you’re doing great! I have missed reading your blogs. First I was sick for quite sometime, then there were a few changes in my team which led me to be busy beyond belief! Just recently things have gotten a little easier. Great job, organizing is no mean feat! Cleaning is always so time consuming! I would need 2 days for my room as well! 😛

    Reply
  33. dgkaye
    dgkaye says:

    Lol Bun, you crack me up! Perhaps I could hire you to clean up my mountain around my desk. I think my fear of that though is that I at least know under what pile to look to find things. 🙂 😉

    Reply

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